Hudad in the Highlands

140 thoughts on “Hudad in the Highlands”

    1. Thanks. Yes, it either mostly up or mostly down, and while I was puffing away, the locals were all just taking it their stride!!!

  1. THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR THE LOVELY PHOTOGRAPHS OF WHAT SEEMS LIKE A VERY INTERESTING PLACE BUT PARTICULARLY THANK YOU FOR THE WONDERFUL WORDS. SO OFTEN WE GO TRAIPSING OFF INTO THE SUNSET THINKING THAT WHEREVER WILL BE EXACTLY LIKE THE PLACE WE JUST CAME FROM – THIS DESPITE THE FACT THAT WE KNOW THAT IT COULD NEVER BE SO AND ISN’T FOR SURE BECAUSE WE ARE REALLY LOOKING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT. BUT IN SOME WAYS THERE IS THE EXPECTATION THAT EVERYONE WILL BE FRIENDLY AND RECEIVING BUT PEOPLE ARE PEOPLE WHEREVER YOU GO – SOME ARE FRIENDLY, RECEIVING AND HELPFUL AND OTHERS ARE NOT AND SOME ARE NOT THIS OR THAT. ONE CAN HOPE THAT TO MEET THE FRIENDLY ONES OR THROUGH ONES OWN FRIENDLINESS BRING OUT THE FRIENDLINESS IN ANOTHER BUT IF NO , NOT. THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO REMEMBER IS TO BE THE BEST ONE CAN BE WHILE VISITING ANOTHER COUNTRY BECAUSE IN THE END YOU, AS THE VISITOR ARE THE AMBASSADOR FOR YOUR OWN COUNTRY AND CULTURE. OBVIOUSLY, THIS WAS YOU AND HENCE, YOU WERE WELL RECEIVED. MY HISTORY TEACHER (AND NOT ONLY HE) ALWAYS SAID, “WHEN IN ROME, DO AS THE ROMANS DO.” CONGRATULATIONS , AMBASSADOR, HAPPY TRAVELLING THROUGHOUT THE MANY BEAUTIFUL PARTS OF THIS WONDERFUL PLANET OF OURS!!!

    1. Thank you Marialla for the lovely and thoughtful comment. Your history teacher was right – no point trying to do as you always do at home as you will never experience life as it is in another culture this way, it will only lead to frustration. It is also my experience that if I am friendly I am almost always met by friendliness.

  2. First, I liked your post; loved your pics. Not to get off the subject, but whatever the credentials are that related the rock hyrax to the elephant is a bunch of boloney–I don’t care how scientific the classification was. That thing is closer related to a mongoose, or guinea pig than an elephant.

    1. Thanks. On your note about the Hyrax – you are right about it being different, to the point of having its own order (Hyracoidea). But I think it is interesting that science has related it to the elephants and also dugongs. How about we just stick with mammal though?!

  3. What wonderful touring you do! My envy is kept at bay only because I can go by proxy by looking at your photos. Wonderful.

  4. Loved all the pics! The place looks good and even the people sound good! Even I have heard a lot about locals being unfriendly. It is a difference when you find the local people friendly with you. You feel more at home. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

    1. Thank you so much Ann. I have to say that most of my experiences in Ethiopia have been good, but this was great! I did feel at home there. Thanks for the congrats and the nice comment.

    1. Thank you so much. It was a wonderful experience for me, and probably the most immersed I have been in local culture in Ethiopia. I hope you get to experience it one day too. Thanks for the nice comment.

    1. They are also fairly easy to just watch for hours. It got to the point that they didn’t even care that I was there – I could talk and move and about and they just went about their business! I have been living in Ethiopia for 3 years now. It is definitely a place to visit that is very diverse – culture, people, climate and scenery. Thanks for commenting.

    1. Thank you Katie. They made the best Special Tibs (Sauteed meat, onion, tomatoes and capsicum eaten with injera – the flat bread) I’ve had in my whole 3 years in Ethiopia – you can see how fresh the meat was! But actually, the most amazing meals I have on these sorts of trips come from near strangers who invite you into their home and share whatever they have with you. It is very heartwarming.

  5. I think its great to see life through others opportunities. What a wonderful way to see outside our box, and so much like national geographic. Thank you for such a good job sharing. Thanks to wordpress.com

  6. Erin, did it get pretty cold at night, that high up? You mentioned a religious aspect to the plateau – is it connected to the Rastafarians? I know they believe Haile Selassie was a great prophet, perhaps even an incarnation of Jesus himself. Related to elephants or not, the Dassies appear to be grinning. Perhaps they enjoyed your pictures as much as I did. Well done.

    1. Hi, thank you John. It was very cold at night – not sure I have any images of me all dressed up with even gloves and beanies! Most of the country is religious – though it seems Rastafarianism is quite small and mostly connected to a town in the south of Ethiopia.

  7. Great presentation! Love the pictures and actually learned something today reading your post. Thank you so much for sharing

    1. Thank you very much. Great to hear you learned something – I also love learning new stuff all the time, hence all my travels!

    1. Oh, I was so absorbed in writing about my incredible experience that I forgot to mention in the start that it is in Ethiopia. Thank you for the nice comment.

    1. Thank you. I live in Ethiopia at present, so found out about it through a local. Hudad hasn’t been open that long, but there is also another group (TESFA) that do really great hikes through the highlands too (it is in LP).

  8. These pictures are so incredible I have trouble believing them as real! Beautifully taken images. Thanks.

  9. I’ve really enjoyed looking at your photos, and reading about them. They reminded me of a trip I almost went on, to Tanzania (in Africa). Unfortunately, expense stopped me from going, we had to fund the trip ourselves, but these photos are lovely! Instead of the trip, I’m putting my spare Summer time into creating a place where people can share their stories and experiences. I’d love to have even just a snippet of yours on there, it doesn’t have to be long. You can include some of your photos too, if you’d like. I can’t wait to hear from you! My web address is: http://pragmaticallyeccentric.wordpress.com/share-your-story/

  10. I especially love this series of pics, esp. the Gelada and people shots. It’s as though you have just gone up another peg with your photographic ability. I have viewed these several times – don’t lose your own style!

    1. Hi Dad! Thank you. I am so glad that you liked this series of images. I think the difference for me with this trip was that I didn’t feel rushed and the people were all so nice and interacted with me (including the monkeys in their own way – by not running away!). I actually felt really humbled that people were happy for me to take their photo.

  11. You are one brave soul! To trek around in a new place – I wanna be you when I grow up! And…and…your photos are beautiful. They tell a story and leave an impression. Great job.

  12. What an amazing trek, I love he photos you have to illustrate it all as well. I love the difference in the scenes, from Stonehenge roads to lush vegetation. You have some really nice portraits if the local people and the wildlife, a wonderful travel blog. Sleeping under the stars as well…wow.

    1. Thank you for the really nice comment. Shucks! Not to disappoint but it wasn’t me who slept under the stars, it was another who clearly didn’t feel the cold as much as me!!!

  13. Truly amazing, lovely shots! I am an adventure lover and love photography too. Unfortunately haven’t got that many chances but really planning to do so. Loved the post. 🙂

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